Movie Review: Everest

REVIEWS | Mark Hadley
Wednesday 16 September 2015

Ernest Hemingway once quipped, “There are only three real sports: bull-fighting, car racing and mountain climbing. All the others are mere games.” What his selections have in Everest_Trio_Key Artcommon is a preparedness to weigh your life against the glory that might be obtained. However the film Everest shows what happens when we fail to realise our scale in God’s creation.

Everest is based on the true story of the “1996 Mount Everest Disaster” during which eight people from various expeditions succumbed to the elements due to a combination of crowded routes, poor planning and naked ambition.

The philosophical focus of the film is the tension arising between those who celebrate the “triumph of the human spirit” and those who recognise we are merely flesh and blood. Everest records many heroic moments, and many allowances are made for the men and women who balanced their lives against the danger. But it’s worth remembering, even as we celebrate their survival, that we don’t draw our meaning from our ability to endure or overcome. As inspiring as elements of Everest can be, the Bible reminds us: “No king is saved by the size of his army; no warrior escapes by his great strength.”

God did not make mountains to provide human beings with the opportunity to display how great they are. Everest is a testament to his power, not ours.

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